University of Vermont AAHS

Washington Equine Infectious Anemia Regulations

 

WASHINGTON ADMINISTRATIVE CODE
TITLE 16. AGRICULTURE, DEPARTMENT OF
CHAPTER 16-54. ANIMAL IMPORTATION

 

16-54-020. Illegal importation.
(1) All animals being shipped into this state must have met the requirements of Title 9, Code of Federal Regulations as revised as of January 1, 1998, for movement or importation from foreign countries and in addition must meet all the applicable laws, rules and regulations of the state of Washington pertaining to animal health and care of animals.

(2) It shall be unlawful for any person, firm or corporation to import any animal unless in compliance with the requirements set forth hereafter in this order, and regulations relating to importation into and movement within the state of Washington of poultry, hatching eggs and wildlife. No animal, including poultry and wildlife, that is affected with any infectious or communicable disease shall be imported into the state unless written permission for the importation is obtained from the director and in the instance of wildlife, written permission from the director of the department of wildlife shall also be obtained.

(3) It shall be unlawful for any person, firm, or corporation importing livestock into the state of Washington to fail to stop for inspection at any posted livestock inspection point.

 

16-54-030. Health certificate.
(1) All animals entering Washington shall be accompanied by an official health certificate except:
(a) Dogs and cats originating in Washington and visiting Canada for thirty days or less.
(b) Dogs, cats and ferrets that are family pets traveling by private automobile with their owners who possess a current rabies certificate for the animals. This exemption does not apply to dogs, cats or ferrets imported for sale or puppies, kittens, or kits too young to vaccinate.
(c) Horses traveling into Washington with their Oregon or Idaho owners in personal vehicles for round-trip visits of not more than ninety-six hours duration. This exemption does not apply during emergency disease conditions
declared by the state veterinarian or extend to any required testing.
(d) Llamas and alpacas traveling into Washington with their Oregon or Idaho owners in personal vehicles for round-trip visits of not more than ninety-six hours duration. This exemption does not apply during emergency disease conditions declared by the state veterinarian.
(e) Sheep traveling into Washington with their Oregon or Idaho owners in personal vehicles for round-trip visits of not more than ninety-six hours duration. This exemption does not apply during emergency disease conditions declared by the state veterinarian or extend to any animals entering for breeding purposes.
(f) Those classes of animals specifically exempted in laws or regulations of this state.

(2) Official health certificate shall contain the following information:
(a) Date of inspection. All health certificates void after thirty days, except breeding cattle forty-five days from date of issue. The director may give special exemption for show animals.
(b) Names and addresses of the consignor and consignee.
(c) Certification that the animals are apparently free from evidence of infectious and communicable disease.
(d) Test or vaccination status when required.
(e) Description of each animal to include species, breed, age, sex, tag or tattoo and for cattle, only an official ear tag will be accepted or if registered, the registry name, number and tattoo for individual identification except one brand or other owner identified animals, all of the same description, for which tests are not required.
(f) Certification of disinfection of cars and trucks when required.
(g) An owner/agent statement which says 'the animals in this shipment are those certified to and listed on this certificate' and is signed and dated by the owner, agent, or veterinarian.

(3) All health certificates shall be reviewed by the livestock sanitary official of the state of origin and a copy shall be forwarded immediately to the department of agriculture, Olympia, Washington.


16-54-071. Domestic equine.

(1) Domestic equine animals shall be accompanied by an official health certificate stating that they are free from clinical symptoms of infectious and communicable disease. All equine over six months of age must have a record of a negative test for the diagnosis of equine infectious anemia made within six months prior to entry. Horses moving to Washington from Oregon are excluded from test requirements.

(2) Breeding stallions or their semen shall be tested negative for equine viral arteritis (EVA) within ninety days of import. Positive stallions or semen may be imported with a certifying statement on the health certificate that the consignee has been advised and consents to the shipment. All positive stallions or semen entering Washington shall be moved on a permit issued by the office of the state veterinarian and may be subject to quarantine.

(3) Washington horses may reenter Washington when returning from shows, rides or other events from states that will accept travel to that state with a current "equine certificate of veterinary inspection and interstate movement permit" without additional animal health certifications. Within fourteen days of the return to Washington an "itinerary of interstate travel" must be filed with the state veterinarian's office. Likewise horses from the western state of Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, or New Mexico may enter the state of Washington for shows, rides or other events and return with documents similar to the above named documents under a state system of equine health certification acceptable to the Washington state veterinarian and the state origin by written agreement. In any case, travel under this alternative to normal thirty-day health certification will be limited to not more than ninety days duration for any one excursion and the movement permit shall expire in six months from the date of the certificate.

(4) Equine quarantine stations. Stallions or mares imported from foreign countries listed in 92.301(c)(1) of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) may only be received at an approved equine quarantine station. No person may receive in this state any stallion or mare which is imported from a foreign country in which contagious equine metritis has been reported unless the stallion or mare is imported directly to an approved equine quarantine station in a sealed vehicle. The sealed vehicle shall have been sealed at a federal or federally approved quarantine station or port of entry by a federal or federally approved agent. The imported stallion or mare shall be accompanied by an import permit issued by the state veterinarian's office prior to the date on which the stallion or mare is brought into the state. The vehicle seal may not be removed except by an authorized employee or agent of the department of agriculture at an approved equine quarantine station. All equine animals, including test mares, which are received at an approved equine quarantine station shall be identified with an individual identification of a type approved by the state veterinarian.

(a) Quarantine release. An imported stallion or mare received at an approved equine quarantine station under subsection (4) of this section is quarantined until the quarantine is released by the director of agriculture in writing. A quarantined equine animal may not be removed from the quarantine premises or be allowed in contact with other equine animals on adjacent premises. Contact between a quarantined equine animal and a test mare is permitted, but only pursuant to a written agreement with the department under (d) of this subsection. A test mare which has been in contact with an imported stallion is quarantined until the quarantine is released by the department in writing.

(b) Approved equine quarantine station permit. No person may operate an approved equine quarantine station in Washington state without written permission from the director, Washington department of agriculture. Permits shall expire December 31 of each year. Applications for a permit shall be made in writing as required by the director. The director shall grant or deny a permit application within ninety days after the application is received provided that the application is accompanied by all requisite information and documentation. Every application shall include:

(i) The name and mailing address of the applicant and any trade name or business name to be used by the applicant;

(ii) A statement indicating whether the applicant is an individual, partnership, corporation, cooperative corporation, or other business association or entity;

(iii) The location of the equine quarantine station specified by county, town or city, road or street, and number;

(iv) The name and address of the accredited veterinarian who will perform all identification, handling, testing, and treatment of equine animals at the approved equine quarantine station under procedures or protocols established by the department; and

(v) Other information which the department may require if the information is reasonably relevant to the department's action on the permit request.

(c) Construction requirements. Approved equine quarantine stations shall be constructed and maintained to prevent contact between quarantined equine animals and any other equine animals on the premises, including test mares. An approved equine quarantine station shall be maintained in a clean and sanitary manner.

(d) Testing and treatment procedures. Before permission is granted for the operation of an approved equine quarantine station, the station operator and the accredited veterinarian designated under (b)(iv) of this subsection shall enter into a written agreement with the department establishing procedures and protocols to be followed in the identification, handling, testing, and treatment of equine animals quarantined in the station. The approved equine quarantine station shall be operated in compliance with the agreed procedures and protocols. Procedures and protocols shall be performed by the designated veterinarian except as otherwise authorized by the director.

(e) Recordkeeping. The operator of an approved equine quarantine station shall keep complete and accurate records which shall be made available for inspection and copies of which shall be supplied to the department upon request. Records shall be kept for at least two years after they are made and shall include:

(i) The identification, date of arrival, and date of removal of each imported equine animal received at the quarantine station;

(ii) The name and address of the owner of each equine animal received at the quarantine station correlated with a specific identification of the equine animal; and

(iii) A complete record of the procedures and protocols followed in conjunction with the identification, handling, testing and treatment of each imported animal.

 

CHAPTER 16-71 EQUINE INFECTIOUS ANEMIA

 

16-71-010 Definition.
(1) 'Department' means the Washington state department of agriculture.

(2) 'Director' means the director of the department or his or her duly authorized representative.

(3) 'Equines' means horses, donkeys, mules, ponies and others in the Equidae family.

(4) 'Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)' means infection with the equine infectious anemia lentivirus, affecting both sexes, all ages, all breeds and all species of equines. Infected equines remain carriers for life, constituting a potential source for spread of the infection. There is no known cure or treatment.

(5) 'Official health certificate' means a legible certificate of veterinary inspection executed on an official form published by the state of origin or by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). This certificate must be issued by a licensed, accredited veterinarian or a veterinarian approved by USDA APHIS.

(6) 'Official test' means blood samples tested by USDA-approved laboratories or by people authorized by the state of origin's animal health officials to conduct tests.

(7) 'Reactor' means an equine found positive on an official EIA test.

16-71-022 Procedure.
(1) Positive diagnosis of EIA is made with the agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGID or Coggins test), competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA test) or other official test. A supplementary AGID will be conducted to confirm positives detected with other official tests. Blood samples for EIA testing will be collected by licensed, accredited veterinarians at the owners' request and expense. At sample collection, the veterinarian will make an accurate, detailed identification of the equine on an official test request form. Positive test results are to be reported to state and federal animal health authorities. Owners will be advised of the procedure if equines are found positive on the official test. The owner must sign an agreement regarding disposition of a reactor. The agreement should follow a herd plan as defined in
chapter 16.36 RCW.
(2) All equines over six months of age entering the state must be accompanied by an official health certificate and a record of a negative EIA test conducted within six months prior to importation. Exceptions to the EIA test requirement:
(a) Equines consigned for immediate slaughter;
(b) Equines consigned to a veterinary clinic for the purpose of treatment or surgery, under the supervision of a veterinarian. These equines must return to the state of origin following treatment or surgery and must not be commingled, housed or corralled in common with any other equine;
(c) Equines under six months old;
(d) Oregon-origin equines under a reciprocal arrangement; and
(e) Idaho-origin equines may be excluded when a reciprocal arrangement exists for Washington-origin equines moving into Idaho.
(3) The management or board of governors at race tracks, rodeos, shows, fairs or other assembly points may require negative, official EIA tests within six months prior to consignment or participation for all equines consigned to these assembly points or participating in events.


16-71-030 Quarantine.

(1) Within twenty-four hours after positive test results are known, reactors will be quarantined to the premises of origin as provided in chapter 16.36 RCW. The quarantine will remain in effect until confirmation of reactor status and the reactor's disposition. The quarantine will be released only upon the reactor's death or when it is legally moved from the premises by permit on a VS form 1-27. If reactor status is disclosed while the equine is on a premises other than the owner's, permission may be granted to move the animal to the owner's premises. Reactors can only move by permit on a VS form 1-27. State and federal animal health authorities will conduct an epidemiological investigation to identify other equines exposed to EIA by contact with the reactor. All equines having contact with the reactor must be quarantined. The quarantine
will be removed on these contact equines and movement allowed only after a negative, official EIA test at least 60 days after removal of the reactor.

(2) Confirmed reactors must be euthanized, placed in a quarantine facility for life, donated to a diagnostic or research facility, legally moved to slaughter or legally removed from the state. A state or federal animal health authority or a licensed, accredited veterinarian will conduct euthanasia. For lifelong quarantine, a state or federal animal health authority must approve the isolation facility. The isolation facility must keep the reactor separate from all other equines. It must be screened to prevent transmission of EIA by insects. With consultation of an entomologist, an insect control program must be developed, approved by the director and must be followed routinely. The isolation facility must be located at least 200 yards from any other equines. The department will pay for and hold a lifetime brand inspection on those equines held in lifetime quarantine. If the reactor is donated, moved to slaughter or removed from the state, it can only move by permit on a VS form 1- 27. For removal from the state, the receiving state must agree in advance to accept the reactor. Horses and other equine found positive to the approved test will be quarantined to the premises of origin as provided by law. If reactor is disclosed while horse is on a premise other than the owner's, permission may be granted to move the animal to the owner's premise. Reactor animal will be kept separate and apart from all other horses in an approved isolation facility. All horses on a premise where reactors are or have been located will be quarantined and movement allowed only after a negative test of animals so exposed. Quarantine will be released only upon the death of the reactor, when it is moved with permit to slaughter, or if legally removed from the state, the receiving state agreeing and accepting the movement of the reactor animal to said state, and all other horses on the premise are negative to an approved test.


16-71-035. Identification of reactors.
Confirmed reactors will be permanently identified by lip tattooing or branding with a hot iron, chemical brand or freeze brand. A lip tattoo is applied to the inside surface of the upper lip and consists of the numbers 91 followed by the letter A, with each character being at least one inch high and three-fourths of an inch wide. A brand is applied on the left side of the neck or left shoulder and consists of the numbers 91 followed by the letter A, with each character being at least two inches high. Permanent identification will be applied by state or federal animal health authorities or by licensed, accredited veterinarians. Permanent identification is not necessary if the reactor is moved directly to slaughter under permit with a VS form 1-27 and the vehicle is officially sealed.


Amended in 2000.
Reviewed by AAHS in October 2001.


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