University of Vermont AAHS

Indiana Equine Infectious Anemia Regulations

 

INDIANA ADMINISTRATIVE CODE
TITLE 345. INDIANA STATE BOARD OF ANIMAL HEALTH
ARTICLE 1. DOMESTIC ANIMAL DISEASE CONTROL; GENERAL PROVISIONS
RULE 3. IMPORTATION OF DOMESTIC ANIMALS

 

345 IAC 1-3-1. GENERAL PROVISIONS FOR PREVENTING SPREAD OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASE
Sec. 1. (a) No person may transport into Indiana any animal unless the requirements in this rule (345 IAC 1-3) are first met.

(b) When the state veterinarian has reason to believe that:
(1) the transportation of animals or products derived from animals into Indiana would create a hazard to the citizens or animals of Indiana; or
(2) a person has not met the requirements in this rule (345 IAC 1-3);
the state veterinarian may do the following:
(A) Take any legal action necessary to prevent the transportation of animals and products derived from animals into, out of, within, or through Indiana.
(B) Control or prohibit the public or private sale of animals.
(C) Issue an order quarantining animals to a premises or otherwise restricting the movement of animals onto or off of a premises.
(D) Issue an order requiring animals be moved.
(E) Order the vaccination, testing, or veterinary evaluation of any animal.
(F) Order the testing and evaluation of any product derived from animals.
(G) Order an animal be identified with a tag, brand, notch, tattoo, or any other form of identification.
(H) Order the cleaning and disinfecting of any building, premises, equipment, and conveyance to guard against the spread of disease.
(I) Order animal byproducts, including manure and carcasses, be disposed of in a manner that protects against the spread of disease.
(J) Order an animal be sold for slaughter.
(K) Order an animal be condemned pursuant to IC 15-2.1-18-16.

(c) Whenever an animal is transported into Indiana, a copy of any certificate of veterinary inspection approved by the state of origin shall be forwarded to the Indiana state veterinarian within ten (10) days after the date of issue by the state veterinarian in the state of origin.

 

345 IAC 1-3-1.5. DEFINITIONS
Sec. 1.5. The definitions in IC 15-2.1-2 and the following definitions apply throughout this rule (345 IAC 1-3):

(1) "Approved official health certificate" or "approved certificate of veterinary inspection" means an official certificate of veterinary inspection endorsed or approved by the chief livestock health official of the state of origin.

(2) "Approved vaccine" means a vaccine that is:
(A) approved by the board for use in Indiana; and
(B) manufactured under license granted by the Veterinary Biologics Division, United States Department of Agriculture.

(3) "Baby calves" means calves of all breeds that are:
(A) imported without dams; and
(B) under two hundred (200) pounds in weight.

(4) "Board" means the Indiana state board of animal health created under IC 15-2.1.

(5) "Cattle" means all animals of the bovine species and all animals of the bison species.

(6) "Cervid" or "cervidae" means all members of the cervidae family, including deer, elk, moose, caribou, reindeer, and related species and hybrids thereof.

(7) "Chronic wasting disease" or "CWD" means a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cervids.

(8) "Class A", "Class B", or "Class C" state or zone means the state or zone is designated or classified by the United States Department of Agriculture as a Brucellosis "A", Brucellosis "B", or Brucellosis "C" area.

(9) "Domestic animal" has the meaning set forth in IC 15-2.1-2-15.

(10) "Duly recognized slaughtering establishment" or "approved slaughtering establishment" means an establishment where domestic animals are slaughtered and processed for human consumption under the federal Meat Inspection Act (21 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) or the Indiana Meat and Poultry Inspection Act (IC 15-2.1-24).

(11) "Equine infectious anemia" or "EIA" means the infectious disease equine infectious anemia caused by a lentivirus, equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV).

(12) "Equine infectious anemia test" means the official test for the detection of EIA as defined in 345 IAC 6-1.1.

(13) "Farm of origin of cattle and bison" means a farm or other premises where cattle or bison to be shipped interstate were born or have been kept for not less than four (4) months prior to the date of shipment and which premises, within the four (4) months prior to the date of shipment, have not been used to assemble cattle or bison from any other premises.

(14) "Feeder cattle" means the following cattle, but does not include female dairy type cattle of any kind:
(A) Steers of any age.
(B) Nonpregnant and nonparturient females.
(C) Bulls of beef breeds that are obviously under eighteen (18) months of age and are intended for slaughter after having reached the desired feeding state.

(15) "Feeder pigs" means:
(A) swine intended for feeding purposes, commonly designated as feeder pigs; and
(B) swine of any breed, weighing not in excess of one hundred eighty (180)
pounds.

(16) "Hatchery" means hatchery equipment on one (1) premises operated or controlled by any person, company, or corporation for the hatching of poultry.

(17) "Hatching eggs" means eggs of poultry for hatching purposes, including embryonated eggs.

(18) "Immediate slaughter" means livestock that are designated for slaughter must be slaughtered within seven (7) days of first consignment.

(19) "Johne's disease" means an infectious communicable disease that primarily affects cattle, sheep, goats, and other domestic, exotic, and wild ruminants, also known as paratuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium paratuberculosis.

(20) "National Poultry Improvement Plan" or "NPIP" means the National Poultry Improvement Plan and Auxiliary Provisions adopted by the board in 345 IAC 4- 4-1.

(21) "Normal trade area" means an area in an adjoining state in which are located buyers and sellers who normally do business at an Indiana auction market, the size and extent of such area to be determined by the board.

(22) "Official ear tag" is a metal identification ear tag that conforms to the nine (9) character alpha-numeric National Uniform Ear Tagging System and that is the appropriate color.

(23) "Official health certificate", "health certificate", or "certificate of veterinary inspection" means the printed form adopted by a state to record the owner, identification, description, tests, vaccinations, and other data concerning the health status of domestic animals listed thereon. The certificate must be:
(A) issued for feeder pigs within fifteen (15) days prior to importation;
(B) issued for all other domestic animals within thirty (30) days prior to importation;
(C) signed by a licensed and accredited veterinarian; and
(D) in compliance with all board rules for health certificates.

(24) "Official test" means a disease detection test approved by the state veterinarian conducted in a laboratory approved by the state veterinarian.

(25) "Permit" means a permit for importation of domestic animals issued by the the [sic] state veterinarian.

(26) "Poultry" means live chickens and turkeys of all ages.

(27) "Premises identification number" means a unique number assigned by the state veterinarian to a livestock production unit that is, in the judgment of the state veterinarian, epidemiologically distinct from other livestock production units. A premises identification number shall consist of the state's two-letter postal abbreviation (IN) followed by the premises' assigned number.

(28) "Quarantine" means a law or order restricting or prohibiting the movement of animals onto or off of a premises, or into or out of an area.

(29) "State veterinarian" means the state veterinarian appointed under IC 15-2.1-4 or an authorized agent.


345 IAC 1-3-1.8. TEST RESULTS
Sec. 1.8. (a) An animal tests negative for a disease or passes a test for a disease when a test conducted in compliance with Indiana law and generally accepted testing procedures indicates that the animal is not infected with the disease.

(b) An animal fails, responds to, or has a response to a test for a disease when a test conducted in compliance with Indiana law and generally accepted testing procedures indicates that an animal is or may be infected with the disease.

 

345 IAC 1-3-2. RESTRICTED MOVEMENT OF ANIMALS
Sec. 2. (a) A person may not transport into Indiana an animal that originates from a herd, premises, or area under quarantine because of disease concerns unless a rule of the board or an order of the state veterinarian specifically allows for such movement.

(b) A person may not transport into Indiana an animal that has tested positive or a disease that is required to be reported under 345 IAC 1-6 unless another rule of the board or an order of the state veterinarian specifically allows for such movement.

(c) The state veterinarian may control the transportation of animals into, out of, or through Indiana to achieve any lawful objective of the board, including the prevention, mitigation, diagnosis, or control of diseases in animals or products derived from animals.

 

345 IAC 1-3-3. IDENTIFICATION REQUIRED; EXCEPTIONS
Sec. 3. (a) All domestic animals entering Indiana, regardless of age, sex, or breed, shall be identified as follows:
(1) Each animal shall be individually identified utilizing a method of identification acceptable for that species. Acceptable methods of identification are as follows:
(A) An ear tag.
(B) A tattoo.
(C) An individual brand.
(D) A standard ear notch.
(E) A registration number.
(F) A method of identification that is approved by the state veterinarian.
(2) Each animal shall be individually described on the accompanying certificate of veterinary inspection.

(b) The following official identification is approved for livestock transported into Indiana:
(1) Swine must be identified using:
(A) a standard ear notch or acceptable ear tag for breeding animals; and
(B) a standard ear notch for exhibition swine.
Official ear tags shall be used for feeder pigs. (See IC 15-2.1-12-7.5.)
(2) Cattle must be identified using:
(A) an official ear tag;
(B) a tattoo;
(C) an individual brand; or
(D) a registration number if accompanied by registration papers.
(3) Sheep must be identified using:
(A) a tattoo;
(B) a standard ear notch; or
(C) an ear tag.
(4) Goats must be identified using:
(A) a tattoo;
(B) a standard ear notch; or
(C) an ear tag.
(5) Horses must be identified using:
(A) a lip tattoo;
(B) an individual brand;
(C) a registration number if accompanied by registration papers; or
(D) a descriptive marking with name.
(6) Cervidae must be identified using:
(A) an ear tag; or
(B) a tattoo.
(7) Any species may be identified using other identification approved by the state veterinarian.

(c) Any animal may be identified using a permanent electronic chip implant that uniquely identifies the animal if the following requirements are met:
(1) The chip identification number is written on the certificate of veterinary inspection or shipping manifest.
(2) A piece of equipment that is capable of accurately reading the chip implant accompanies the animal at all times.
(3) The owner or caretaker of the animal allows board personnel to use the equipment necessary to read the implanted chip upon request. If the equipment provided by an owner or caretaker of an animal does not allow for an accurate identification of an animal for any reason, the animal will be deemed unidentified for the purpose of this rule (345 IAC 1-3) unless the animal is identified using another method authorized by this rule (345 IAC 1-3).

(d) If additional identification is present, at least one (1) additional identification shall also be listed on the certificate of veterinary inspection.

(e) The following types of animals are exempt from the identification requirements in this section:
(1) Steers.
(2) Poultry.
(3) Slaughter animals.
(4) Baby calves and feeder heifers from Brucellosis-free and Class A states.

 

345 IAC 1-3-4. CERTIFICATE OF VETERINARY INSPECTION AND PERMIT REQUIRED FOR IMPORTATION
Sec. 4. (a) A person may not transport into Indiana a domestic animal, or a wild animal of the bovine, ovine, caprine, bison, cervidae, camelid, or porcine species, unless the animal is accompanied by an official certificate of veterinary inspection. The following animals may be transported into Indiana without a certificate of veterinary inspection:
(1) Those consigned for immediate slaughter.
(2) The state veterinarian may allow a person to transport into Indiana an
animal without a certificate of veterinary inspection in order to facilitate the diagnosis, prevention, or control of disease.

(b) No person may transport into Indiana an animal other than those described in subsection (a) unless the animal is accompanied by a shipping manifest clearly stating the following information:
(1) The origin of each animal.
(2) An individual description and identification of each animal.
(3) The destination of each animal.
(4) The import permit number, if required under subsection (d), for the shipment.

(c) The state veterinarian may set specific restrictions, prerequisites, and other requirements for the transportation of diseased or experimental animals into Indiana. Each official certificate of veterinary inspection or shipping manifest must note any restrictions imposed.

(d) No person may transport into Indiana any domestic or wild animal of the bovine, ovine, caprine, bison, cervidae, camelid, or porcine species, regardless of age, sex, or breed, without first obtaining a permit to transport the animal into Indiana. Permits shall be obtained from the state veterinarian. The state veterinarian shall assign a permit number for each permit issued. The permit number shall be recorded on the certificate of veterinary inspection associated with the permitted animals, or if a certificate of veterinary inspection is not required, the shipping manifest accompanying the shipment. The certificate of veterinary inspection or shipping manifest with the correct permit number must be in possession of the person in charge of animals during movement. A person transporting the following animals into Indiana is exempt from the requirements in this subsection:
(1) Animals transported into Indiana for immediate slaughter.
(2) The state veterinarian may waive all or part of the requirements in this subsection for a specific shipment of animals to facilitate the diagnosis, prevention, or control of disease.

(e) Permits for the transportation of animals into Indiana may be obtained day or night, including weekends and holidays, by calling the following telephone numbers:
(1) For a permit to transport an animal of the bovine, ovine, caprine, bison, cervidae, or camelid species, call (317) 227-0316.
(2) For a permit to transport an animal of the porcine species, call (317) 227-0311.

 

345 IAC 1-3-4.5. CARRIERS; INSPECTION; SANITATION
Sec. 4.5. (a) Owners and operators of common carriers and private conveyances may not transport any animal into, within, or through the state of Indiana, except in compliance with the provisions set forth in this rule (345 IAC 1- 3).

(b) All common carriers and private conveyances transporting animals into, within, or through the state of Indiana shall be subject to inspection and may be stopped by any agent or employee of the board or any other law enforcement officer commissioned in the state of Indiana, to make an investigation to determine compliance with the provisions of this rule (345 IAC 1-3).

(c) All railway cars, trucks, and other conveyances used for the transportation of animals and poultry shall be maintained in a sanitary condition.

(d) Owners and operators of conveyances that have been used to transport animals infected with or exposed to infectious, contagious, or communicable disease shall have such conveyances thoroughly cleaned and disinfected prior to transporting any other animals and upon the order of the state veterinarian.

 

345 IAC 1-3-26.5. EQUINES; INTERSTATE MOVEMENT
Sec. 26.5. (a) All equines imported into Indiana must have tested negative for E.I.A. within the twelve (12) months prior to the animal entering Indiana. The animal must be accompanied by an official laboratory test report indicating the negative E.I.A. test. The following animals are exempt from the testing required in this subsection:
(1) Suckling foals if they are accompanied by their dam and the dam meets the testing requirements in this subsection.
(2) The state veterinarian may exempt equine from the import test required in this subsection to accommodate unique and emergency situations if the waiver does not subject Indiana equine to a substantial risk of E.I.A. infection.
(3) Animals exempted under subsection (b).

(b) All equines imported into Indiana to be delivered directly to an Indiana licensed auction market must have tested negative for E.I.A. within the twelve (12) months prior to the animal entering Indiana. The animals must be accompanied by an official laboratory test report indicating the negative E.I.A. test. The following animals are exempt from the testing required in this subsection:
(1) Suckling foals if they are accompanied by their dam and the dam meets the testing requirements in this subsection.
(2) Equine sold for slaughter.
(3) The state veterinarian may exempt an equine from the import test required in this subsection to accommodate unique and emergency situations if the waiver does not subject Indiana equine to a substantial risk of E.I.A. infection. The consignor is responsible for obtaining the negative E.I.A. test. If the consignor does not obtain a negative E.I.A. test and the animal tests positive for E.I.A. within sixty (60) days of the sale, the sale is void.

(c) The state veterinarian may order any equine not tested for E.I.A. prior to entry into Indiana be tested for E.I.A. after entry into Indiana.

 

RULE 6. REPORTABLE DISEASES

 

345 IAC 1-6-1. REPORTABLE DISEASES IDENTIFIED
Sec. 1. The following diseases in animals are reportable in Indiana:
(1) All foreign animal diseases.
(2) Anthrax.
(3) Brucellosis.
(4) Equine infectious anemia.
(5) Fowl typhoid.
(6) Johnes' disease.
(7) Mycoplasma gallisepticum (turkeys).
(8) Pseudorabies.
(9) Pullorum disease.
(10) Rabies.
(11) Scabies (cattle and sheep).
(12) All transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, including scrapie and chronic wasting disease.
(13) Tuberculosis.
(14) Vesicular diseases.


345 IAC 1-6-2. INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY
Sec. 2. Any veterinarian, owner, or custodian of an animal must report a clinical diagnosis of a reportable disease in the animal to the office of the state veterinarian within two (2) business days of the diagnosis..


345 IAC 1-6-3. LABORATORY RESPONSIBILITY
Sec. 3. Any diagnostic laboratory must report a diagnosis of a reportable disease in an animal located in Indiana to the office of the state veterinarian within two (2) business days of the diagnosis.

 

ARTICLE 6. HORSES
RULE 1.1. EQUINE INFECTIOUS ANEMIA (E.I.A.) CONTROL

 

345 IAC 6-1.1-1. DEFINITIONS
Sec. 1. (a) The definitions in IC 15-2.1-2 and the following definitions apply throughout this rule (345 IAC 6-1.1):
(1) "Accredited veterinarian" means a veterinarian that has been approved by the United States Department of Agriculture in accordance with 9 CFR 161.
(2) "Board" means the Indiana state board of animal health or its authorized representative.
(3) "Coggins test" means the agar gel immunodiffusion test for the diagnosis of E.I.A.
(4) "E.I.A." means the infectious disease equine infectious anemia caused by a lentivirus, equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV).
(5) "Equine" means all animals in the family equidae (genus equus) including the following:
(A) Horses.
(B) Asses.
(C) Jacks.
(D) Jennies.
(E) Hinnies.
(F) Mules.
(G) Donkeys.
(H) Burros.
(I) Ponies.
(J) Zebras.
(6) "Official test" shall have the meaning set forth in section 4.5 of this rule (345 IAC 6-1.1-4.5).
(7) "Owner" means the legal owner, or the legal owner's agent, including the person in possession of or caring for the animal.
(8) "Quarantine" means the act of placing an animal in isolation from other animals on a premises or in areas specified by the board, not moving the animal from the premises or area, and not allowing other animals to enter the premises
or area.
(9) "Reactor" means an equine that tests positive for E.I.A.
(10) "Reporting date" means the date that an E.I.A. test result is reported out of the laboratory as recorded on the test report.
(11) "State veterinarian" means the state veterinarian appointed under IC 15-2.1-4 or a designee.
(12) "Test report" means the official form used by a laboratory to report the results of an E.I.A. test. The report must include a complete description of the animal being tested including the following information about the animal:
(A) Identifiable descriptive markings.
(B) Breed.
(C) Color.
(D) Age.
(E) Sex.
(F) Registration number, electronic identification number, tattoo, and brand, if present.

(b) The following apply throughout this rule (345 IAC 6-1.1):
(1) An animal tests negative for a disease, passes a test for a disease, or is a negative animal when a test conducted in accordance with Indiana law and generally accepted testing procedures indicates that the animal is not infected with the disease.
(2) An animal is a positive animal or fails, responds to, or has a response to a test for a disease when a test conducted in accordance with Indiana law and generally accepted testing procedures indicates that an animal is or may be infected with the disease.

 

345 IAC 6-1.1-4.5. E.I.A. TESTING
Sec. 4.5. (a) The state veterinarian may do the following:
(1) Require that all animals tested for E.I.A. be temporarily identified until such time as the test results from the initial test and all retests are known.
(2) Utilize board funds to pay a licensed, accredited veterinarian to conduct E.I.A. tests or other work related to controlling E.I.A.

(b) "Official test" means the official test for the detection of E.I.A. Official tests must:
(1) be conducted in a laboratory approved by the state veterinarian to conduct official E.I.A. tests;
(2) be one (1) of the following:
(A) Agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGID), also known as the Coggins test.
(B) Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test (ELISA).
(C) Any other recognized E.I.A. test that is approved by the state veterinarian; and
(3) utilize blood drawn by a licensed, accredited veterinarian.

(c) The western blot test, also called the immunoblot test, may be used to clarify equivocal results of official tests or to resolve conflicting results. To be an official test, the western blot test must be run at the United States Department of Agriculture National Veterinary Services Laboratory.

(d) The state veterinarian may approve a laboratory to conduct official E.I.A. tests if the laboratory can conduct the tests in a timely, accurate, and efficient manner. When considering laboratories for E.I.A. test approval, the state veterinarian may consider and base a decision on United States Department of Agriculture standards, licenses, and approvals.


345 IAC 6-1.1-5. E.I.A. POSITIVE ANIMALS
Sec. 5. (a) The owner must quarantine a reactor to the owner's premises from the time the owner is notified of the animal's reactor status until such time as a permit to move the animal is obtained from the state veterinarian. The state veterinarian may issue a permit to move a reactor if moving the animal furthers the goal of containing the spread of E.I.A.

(b) The owner of a reactor may elect to have the animal retested for E.I.A. one (1) time before identification is applied under subsection (c) and a disposition is chosen under subsection (d) if the following requirements are met:
(1) The retest must be conducted by board personnel or a licensed, accredited veterinarian designated by the state veterinarian.
(2) The retest must be completed within fourteen (14) days of the reporting date from the first test.

(c) A reactor must be permanently branded on the left side of the neck with the number 32 followed by the letter A, (32A). The following apply to the branding required in this subsection:
(1) The brand must be applied by a board employee or a person designated by the state veterinarian.
(2) The brand must be applied not later than fourteen (14) days after the reporting date from the E.I.A. positive test or retest, whichever is later.
(3) The brand must be:
(A) at least two (2) inches in size; and
(B) applied using a chemical brand or freeze-marking technique.

(d) The owner of a reactor must handle the reactor by complying with one (1) of the following requirements:
(1) Confining the reactor to the owner's premises in an area that is not less than two hundred (200) yards from any other area used to hold equines that are not reactors. Reactors must be separated from E.I.A. negative animals at all times. Reactors must be housed in a fly controlled environment. The owner must implement a fly control program utilizing at least one (1) of the following:
(A) Fly baits or strips.
(B) Electric bug killers.
(C) Application of a registered pesticide according to its label.
(2) Euthanizing the reactor. The owner shall notify the state veterinarian not later than forty-eight (48) hours prior to euthanizing the animal. The state veterinarian may require that a board employee witness the euthanasia or that the owner submit proof of the act.
(3) Delivering the reactor to a slaughter establishment or to a market to be sold for slaughter. The owner shall secure a slaughter permit from the state veterinarian or his agent by contacting the board not less than forty-eight (48) hours prior to loading a reactor for shipment. The state veterinarian may order that the reactor must move under official seal issued by the board.

(e) The owner of a reactor must do the following:
(1) Notify the board of the method chosen to handle the E.I.A. reactor under subsection (d) not more than fourteen (14) days after the reporting date for the E.I.A. positive test or retest, whichever is later.
(2) Comply with the requirements for the method chosen to handle the E.I.A. reactor under subsection (d) not later than thirty (30) days after the reporting date for the E.I.A. positive test or retest, whichever is later.

(f) The board will not pay any indemnity or loss of value for any animal that
tests positive for E.I.A.

 

345 IAC 6-1.1-5.5. ANIMALS EXPOSED TO E.I.A.
Sec. 5.5. (a) Whenever an equine tests positive for E.I.A., all equine in the owner's herd are quarantined to the premises until such time as they test negative for E.I.A. pursuant to the testing required in subsection (b).

(b) Whenever an equine tests positive for E.I.A., all equine in the owner's herd that are not reactors must be tested, or retested as the case may be, for E.I.A. The tests required in this subsection must be conducted as follows:
(1) All equine in the owner's herd that are under one hundred eighty (180) days of age on the date the last known reactor is removed from the herd must be tested between two hundred forty (240) and two hundred seventy (270) days of age.
(2) All other equine must be tested between forty-five (45) and sixty (60) days after all known reactors are removed from the herd. The state veterinarian must determine the exact length of time between forty-five (45) and sixty (60) days for the retest based on the epidemiology of the situation.

(c) The state veterinarian may issue a permit to move a quarantined animal if moving the animal furthers the goal of containing and eradicating E.I.A.

(d) The state veterinarian must conduct an epidemiological investigation into E.I.A. positive equine to determine the incidence and distribution of the disease. The state veterinarian may order any equine on any premises be tested for E.I.A. to further the epidemiological investigation.

 

345 IAC 6-1.1-6. PROHIBITED ACTIONS; COOPERATION
Sec. 6. (a) No person may present or otherwise use an E.I.A. laboratory test report for an equine for the purpose of identifying or establishing E.I.A. status for a different equine.

(b) No person may remove any identification utilized for the purpose of E.I.A. testing until the animal is released from quarantine under this rule (345 IAC 6-1.1).

(c) When board representatives are conducting tasks pursuant to this article (345 IAC 6), an equine owner must cooperate, including:
(1) presenting animals for testing or identification;
(2) restraining animals;
(3) identifying animals;
(4) allowing access to animals, facilities, and equipment;
(5) refraining from direct or indirect interference with board representatives;
(6) providing complete, accurate, and timely information.

 

ARTICLE 7. LIVESTOCK DEALERS, MARKETING, EXHIBITIONS, AND SLAUGHTER
RULE 5. EXHIBITION OF DOMESTIC ANIMALS AND POULTRY

 

345 IAC 7-5-1. DEFINITIONS
Sec. 1. The following definitions apply throughout this rule (345 IAC 7- 5):

(1) "Approved official health certificate" or "approved certificate of veterinary inspection" means an official health certificate or certificate of veterinary inspection which bears the endorsement or approval of the chief livestock health official of the state of origin.

(2) "Equine infectious anemia" or "EIA" means an acute or chronic disease of
equidae, characterized by intermittent fever, depression, progressive weakness, loss of weight, edema, and progressive or transitory anemia.

(3) "Equine infectious anemia test" means the official test for the detection of EIA shall be conducted in a state-USDA approved laboratory and shall be one (1) of the following:
(A) Agar Gel Immuno--Diffusion Test (AGID).
(B) Any other recognized EIA test that is approved by the board. Blood for all tests must be drawn by a licensed, accredited veterinarian.

(4) "National Poultry Improvement Plan" or "NPIP" means the National Poultry Improvement Plan and Auxiliary Provisions adopted by the board in 345 IAC 4- 4-1.

(5) "Official ear tag" means a metal identification ear tag conforming to the nine (9) character alpha-numeric National Uniform Ear Tagging System and of appropriate color, for example, orange for vaccination.

(6) "Official health certificate" or "certificate of veterinary inspection" means the printed form adopted by any of the various states and designed to record the identification, description, tests, vaccinations, and other data concerning the health status of domestic animals listed thereon, issued and signed by a licensed, accredited veterinarian.

(7) "Quarantine" means an order restricting the movement of domestic animals into or out of, or both, a premises.

(8) "State 4-H department" means the branch of the Cooperative Extension Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) that is responsible for administering the state 4-H programs.


345 IAC 7-5-2.5. HEALTH CERTIFICATE REQUIRED

Sec. 2.5. (a) All out-of-state swine and cattle shall be accompanied by an approved official health certificate or official health certificate with a permit. A cattle permit may be obtained by calling (317) 232-1330. A swine permit may be obtained by calling (317) 232-1333. All Indiana swine shall be accompanied by an approved official health certificate unless otherwise exempted by this rule.

(b) The following are required to have an official health certificate:

(1) All sheep and goats.

(2) All Indiana cattle.

(3) Out-of-state equine.

(c) All animals subject to this section must show no symptoms of any infectious or contagious disease and be permanently and individually identified, and such identification must be clearly indicated on the accompanying health certificate. At the discretion of the state veterinarian, the health certificate may be waived in lieu of an inspection by personnel who have been approved for this purpose by the state veterinarian.

(d) No cattle may be exhibited that show warts or ringworm.

 

345 IAC 7-5-3. PERIOD OF CERTIFICATE VALIDITY
Sec. 3. The official Indiana health certificate is valid for ninety (90) days and an approved health certificate on animals from out of state is valid for thirty (30) days.


345 IAC 7-5-4. FILING OF HEALTH CERTIFICATE

Sec. 4. A copy of the official health certificate must be on file at the state veterinarian's office previous to the opening day of exhibition.


Sec. 5. QUARANTINED ANIMALS PROHIBITED

Sec. 5. Domestic animals which are under quarantine are not eligible for exhibition in Indiana.


345 IAC 7-5-7. DETERMINATION OF ELIGIBILITY OF ANIMAL

Sec. 7. (a) DETERMINATION OF ELIGIBILITY--The determination as to whether any animal meets the requirements for eligibility for exhibition in Indiana shall be made by personnel assigned to the exhibit by the state veterinarian. The animal shall not be exhibited pending any appeal.

(b) DISEASED ANIMAL REMOVED--Any domestic animal that develops or shows signs of any infectious or communicable disease during exhibition must be removed from the premise and surrounding exhibition grounds when determined by personnel assigned to the exhibit by the state veterinarian.


345 IAC 7-5-25.5. OUT-OF-STATE EQUINES FOR EXHIBITION

Sec. 25.5. Equine entering Indiana from another state for exhibition in Indiana must test negative for equine infectious anemia (E.I.A.) within the twelve (12) months preceding the date of exhibition. The following equine are exempt from the E.I.A. test required in this subsection:

(1) A suckling foal that is accompanied by its dam, and the dam meets the E.I.A. testing requirements in this section.

(2) The state veterinarian may exempt equine from the test required in this section to accommodate unique and emergency situations if the waiver does not subject Indiana equine to a substantial risk of E.I.A. infection. The state veterinarian may order an equine not tested for E.I.A. prior to exhibition be tested for E.I.A. during or after exhibition.

 

345 IAC 7-5-25.6. HEALTH CERTIFICATE NOT REQUIRED FOR INDIANA EQUINE
Sec. 25.6. Equine originating from Indiana do not need a health certificate or equine infectious anemia (E.I.A.) test to exhibit in Indiana. This section does not prohibit show sponsors from requiring health certificates and E.I.A. tests for Indiana equine.

 

345 IAC 7-5-25.7. EQUINE NOT TO SHOW SYMPTOMS OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASE
Sec. 25.7. Equine showing symptoms of or testing positive for a communicable disease may not be exhibited in Indiana. Equine infectious anemia is a communicable disease.


345 IAC 7-5-26. PENALTIES FOR VIOLATIONS

Sec. 26. Any person in violation of this regulation [345 IAC 7-5] shall be guilty of a misdemeanor with penalties as set forth in Indiana Code 15-2.1-1 to 21 and amendments thereto.

 

Amended in 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001.
Reviewed by AAHS in October 2001.


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