University of Vermont AAHS

Summary of JP PADDOCK SAYS Final Report

by
Jan Dawson
Principal Investigator
President, American Association for Horsemanship Safety

[reproduced from Summer 2002 Caution:Horses]

“JP Paddock Says” was the latest of a series of investigations to find a way to reduce the number of horse-related injuries on the Navajo Reservation, especially among children.  The American Association for Horsemanship Safety was introduced to the problem as part of a project at the Seba Dalkai Boarding School.  In that project AAHS trained several Navajo to be riding instructors, including renowned Navajo bull rider, James “JP” Paddock.

On its surface the JP Paddock Says project was only a booklet to teach horse safety to school children around the Reservation; however, in reality, it was the latest attempt to identify a target population, produce a resource that could take the desired information to the targeted population around the Navajo Reservation, and have the targeted population retain the information and use it to avoid injuries.

We expected to have a book that taught safe horsemanship in a manner that we could demonstrate by means of pre- and post-tests that kids had learned something.  We also wanted to know what they had learned and if what they knew was homogenous for the three target age groups—4th, 5th and 6th graders.

The results of the project were beyond all expectations and are reported below.  Overall, knowledge of horsemanship safety improved from the pre-test to the post-test by 17.6 percent—a dramatic increase!

Aggregate Scores

By Grades

Pre-Test for 459 Students

Post-Test for 459 Students

Grade

Right

Wrong

% Right

Right

Wrong

% Right

% Change

  3

  110

  100

52.4

  165

    45

78.6

+26.2

  4

  869

  605

59.0

  999

  467

68.1

+  9.1

  5

  748

  539

58.1

  956

  307

75.7

+17.6

  6

1901

1428

57.1

2586

  746

77.6

+20.5

  8

  315

  224

58.4

  421

  118

78.1

+19.7

 

3943

2896

57.7

5127

1683

75.3

+17.6

 


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